drugs

C34. Substance use and suicidality among adolescent psychiatric inpatients

About The Event

Learner category:

  • Beginning Level
  • Novice Level
  • Intermediate Level
  • Expert Level

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the number one public health problem in the United States
  • Participants will be able to state the associated risks for co-occurring disorders between those with mental disorders, and those with substance use disorders
  • Participants will be able to describe the importance of screening for substance use among adolescent psychiatric inpatients

Abstract:

Adolescent substance use has been identified as our nation’s number one public health problem. Individuals with mental health disorders are at increased risk for lifetime prevalence of a substance use disorder. Conversely, those who use substances are at greater risk for the development of other mental health disorders. We examined demographic and clinical characteristics for adolescents, ages 14-18, admitted to an adolescent inpatient psychiatric unit at a major Midwestern university medical center over a 3-month period (September-December, 2019). Among 133 unique admissions, the majority were white (n=104/131, 79%), female (n=81, 61%), with a median age of 16 years. Depression was the most frequently listed first diagnosis (n=80, 60%). The vast majority of all patients endorsed suicidal ideation (n=108/131, 82%), with females significantly more likely than males to do so (72/80 [90%] vs 36/51 [71%], p<0.01). Average length of stay was 7.5 days, with a range of 1 to 28 days. Fully half (n=67/131, 51%) of all adolescent inpatients reported past year use of marijuana (n=59/131=45%), alcohol (n=36/131, 27%), unprescribed medications (n=23/131, 18%), and/or other substances (n=11/131, 8%). Males were more likely than females to have used marijuana (29/52 [56%] vs 28/81 [35%], p<0.05), and to have clinically significant CRAFFT-2 scores of > 2 (18/41 [44%] vs 16/71 [23%], p<0.05). Those with any past year substance use were 4.5 times more likely to report suicidal ideation than those who did not (108/131 [82%] vs 23/131 [18%], p<0.01). These findings reinforce the importance of screening for substance use among adolescent psychiatric inpatients

Author(s):

Stephen Strobbe, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, CARN-AP, FIAAN, FAAN University of Michigan, USA
Dr. Stephen Strobbe is a Clinical Professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, and the Department of Psychiatry. He is board-certified both in psychiatric and addictions nursing. His professional background has included clinical care, research, administration, and education. Dr. Strobbe has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed articles, position statements, book chapters, and other resources related to substance use and addictions nursing. He has been an invited speaker, both nationally and internationally, including the Federated States of Micronesia, Europe, South America, Southeast Asia, and Iceland. Dr. Strobbe is a former Fulbright Scholar to Brazil (2017-2018), Immediate Past President of the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA, 2018-2020), a Fellow of the International Academy of Addictions Nursing (FIAAN, 2016), and a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing (FAAN, 2017).
Jeanette Hokett, MA-ED, BSN, RN, University of Michigan, USA
Jeanette Hokett is the Interim Clinical Nursing Director at the Nyman Family Unit for Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Wellness, and the Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Program at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, University of Michigan. A member of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA) and former Member-at-Large for the Michigan State Board of APNA, Ms. Hokett has presented on topics focused on improving care for psychiatric patients and self-care, along with leading and engaging in many quality improvement projects at unit and institutional levels.
Kaitlyn McDonald, University of Michigan
Kaitlyn McDonald is a junior nursing student at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, where she is involved in a clinical quality improvement project to integrate screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for substance use among adolescents . She is currently involved in a Quality Improvement project involving the screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for substance use on the child and adolescent inpatient psychiatric unit at the University of Michigan. Previously, Ms. McDonald participated in research involving nuclear cardiology at the Michigan Medicine Cardiovascular Center. She currently serves as Director of Professional Development in the University of Michigan Chapter of the Student Nurses Association.
Clare Hoerster, University of Michigan
Clare Hoerster is a senior nursing student at the University of Michigan School of Nursing (UMSN). She is a member of the Honors Program at UMSN, where she is involved in a clinical quality improvement project to integrate screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for substance use on the child and adolescent inpatient psychiatric unit at the University of Michigan. Ms. Hoerster is a James B. Angell Scholar at the University of Michigan, and recipient of University Honors. She is an active member of the University of Michigan Chapter of the Student Nurses Association, and serves as a Student Ambassador for both the School of Nursing and the University of Michigan.
Rhonda Schultz, BSN, RN, University of Michigan
Rhonda Schultz is the Educational Nursing Coordinator (ENC) for the Nyman Family Unit for Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Wellness, and the Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Program at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, University of Michigan. As ENC for the unit, she is responsible for orientation and ongoing education for all unit nursing staff. A certified Non-Abusive Psychological and Physical Intervention (NAPPI) trainer, Ms. Schultz also serves as the unit expert in de-escalation training and has been part of the quality improvement (QI) project team which has helped implement NAPPI throughout Mott Hospital along with other unit-based QI projects.
Jai Ahluwalia
Robert Ploutz-Snyder

Our Speakers

Clare Hoerster
Jai Ahluwalia
Jeanette Hokett
Kaitlyn McDonald
Rhonda Schultz
Robert Ploutz-Snyder
Stephen Strobbe
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